Tag Archives: wheelchair

exposure…

Last week Mac made the trek to UOW (Dad’s University) for his participation in a session on ‘exposure to people with disabilities’.

You can read about the where/what/why here on Shawn’s most recent blog post over at Disability + Media Matters.

At the end of the session we gave an extra bit of ‘secret Mac business’ to these future journos by sharing a couple of our ‘tried and tested’ tips on how to photograph a group shot when “someone in the shot”, courtesy of some ‘not so great head control’, is often looking in the opposite direction to the rest of the group.

Seems like such a minor thing (and some might say superficial)… but could a poorly considered shot be enough for that person to be devalued in the eyes of another, could it send the message that they “aren’t even aware of their surroundings” and therefore “really disabled” rather than someone simply having poor head control?

EXAMPLE ONE:  point & shoot…

Traditional shot where you expect to have the whole group ‘looking down the barrel’

As you can see, Mac is NOT looking at the camera, in this instance it actually looks like he is looking at me so isn’t too bad, but what other techniques can we use?

Group shot with all looking at the camera except for 9 year old Mac.

EXAMPLE TWO: every which way but front…

Potentially a more social and natural looking shot than the one above.  The person with the disability isn’t the ‘stand out’ as the only person not looking at the camera.  Certainly works much better when the shot is actually in focus. ;-)

Group photo with everyone looking in a different direction.

EXAMPLE THREE:  follow Mac’s eyes…

This is my favourite, particularly when you get a run of three or so pics in succession.   Basically, the photographer (or a buddy beside them) will tell everyone where to look based on where Mac is looking.  We have plenty of birthday cake shots with everyone looking to the same spot Mac is – which is rarely at the cake –  it’s much more fun imagining what may have had everyone’s attention when you look back years later.  Once again, the person with the disability isn’t the only one looking away, it’s much more “look, is it a bird, is it a plane…” by the entire group.

A group shot where the group are directed to look wherever the pwd is looking, so all eyes focussed on the same 'off camera' spot.

So, there it is, “Secret Mac Business” and, in the words of my husband, “consider yourselves exposed”.

Do you have any tips and tricks to share?

 

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Filed under Access all Areas, Inclusion... straight up!, things that make me go "glll"

the footy draft and the kid who was ‘second pick’…

 

I know there are people who wonder why some of us fight so hard for the philosophy of inclusion to simply be the norm.

Today was a reminder of why we do what we do.  The concept of inclusion isn’t really about Mac, it’s not about me, or us as a family…   it’s for all of us, our entire community, our entire society.  It makes us all better people.

It makes us gooder

According to Mac’s teacher, this is how things went down today…

Friday is sports day and today’s activity was touch footy (touch football/AusTag/flag football/toque de futebol).

Under Mr B’s guidance the team captains get four picks each – then Mr B divvies up the rest to avoid someone being the potential ‘last pick’.

Mr B was absolutely amazed when Mac was the second pick on one of the teams.  He said, “it wasn’t something I expected – but it was awesome to witness”.

It is these little moments that make you realise what great young people we are growing by ensuring they are ALL together, authentically together.  Not as part of a program, or a unit or by special invitation for part of a day, or for certain subjects or by volunteering to be with the ‘special kids’ as a rostered job.

To these kids Mac is just one of them.  Sure, they know he has a disability… they just don’t care.

For the record… Mr B & I both acknowledged we may not have picked Mac if we were captains.  He kind of sucks at touch footy and we are both, clearly, a little bit too competitive and perhaps not as ‘evolved’ as these kids…

As it turned out he played briefly then switched it up to become a touch judge/linesman.

To be honest, I’m not sure what is funnier – Mac playing touch footy in the chariot or Mac being a linesman (bearing in mind his vision impairment).  I guess touch footy at CPS just became a ‘game of chance’.

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crrrcht… he’s still OK!

Shawn has just returned back for breakfast after his overnight at Mac’s school camp.  Mac is sleeping in a dorm room with three other boys and Shawn is in the next room… It was decided Shawn head down each night just to help out since Mac’s sleeping is still a fairly new phenomenon.

To give Mac and the boys some independence we decided to give them a walkie talkie to tell Shawn if there were any problems.  We had thought the rooms were adjoining but this wasn’t the case so the walkie talkies were a good option and the boys were keen to take on that role.

Apparently the walkie talkie conversations through the night went something like this…

9:30 PM       LIGHTS OUT

All boys in bed…
Mac pretty much asleep as soon as his head hit the pillow.

9:35 PM       FIRST CALL

Tom: crrrcht… he’s still OK. Over.

Shawn:crrrcht… OK (chuckling), how about I’ll
presume he’s fine UNLESS I get a call.

9:45 PM      SECOND CALL

Tom: crrrcht… Shawn, Mac’s making a noise
and we can’t get to sleep

Shawn: crrrcht… What kind of noise.

Tom: crrrcht…[mimics Mac’s delightful lip smacking]

Shawn: crrrcht… Oh, that’s not that a bad noise (thinking of all the dramatic noises it could have been),  maybe you guys aren’t trying hard enough to get to sleep.  See how you go if you just ignore it.

Tom: crrrcht… oh, OK then.  Over.

Shawn checked them a little while later… all sound asleep.

4.30 AM        THIRD CALL

Tom: crrrcht… umm Shawn, Mac’s making a weird moaning noise.

Shawn went in to assist.  Only to find Mac really sound asleep not making a peep.  As he rolled Mac, just in case he was a bit uncomfortable, he heard a “weird moaning sound” from one of the other beds….

Ahhh, too funny, Mac wasn’t actually the culprit.  Sid, one of his roomies, was the ‘maker of the sleep moaning sounds’.

Tom settled back in and all boys slept for a few more hours.

Well done guys – you are all kinds of awesome!

 

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Filed under Access all Areas, friends, Inclusion... straight up!, the big picture, things that make me go "glll"

cross country: MMXII

Autumn signals the start of the cross country season in Australia.

Once again Mac’s school event was held at our home track.

A couple of Mac’s classmates convinced Mac and Tim (Mac’s aide) to run with them in the 10 years boys event rather than “the nines”.  I asked the boys if they were hoping to finish in the places to ensure a spot on the district team.  “Nah” they responded, “we usually try to finish in about the twenties”.   When asked, Mac thought that was an OK place to finish and was very happy to run with the ‘lads’.

I always remind Mac of his ‘home advantage’ (never mind the four wheels and the able-bodied ‘pusher’ he also uses ;-) ).

But when I say ‘home track’… I’m not exaggerating.   The local cross country course is literally the property next door to ours.  It’s part of my Grandfather’s old farm – now in the capable hands of my Aunt & Uncle.   In fact, Mac & his cousins are sixth generation to live on this property… not bad considering how relatively young our country is.

Mac’s aide from last year “Ms M” had a great chuckle as she realised she hadn’t given Tim the information on how to take a short cut and hide out for the middle two kms…  Oh well, they made the distance… Mac didn’t even seem out of breath.

PHOTOS: using Halftone app on my iPhone 

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rampage

There was an in-class assessment task recently.  Mac & his classmates have been learning about shelters and investigating the many different shelters, buildings and constructions.   The assessment involved building a shelter during class time from materials they collected at home.  There was no limit on where or what the shelter had to be – intergalactic, subterranean, subaquatic, floating were all viable options.  I wasn’t really sure what Mac would be doing instead of building and, other than collecting scrap materials/cardboard cut offs for him, hadn’t done a lot of other preparation.

I chatted to him over breakfast about the in-class task that day.  I asked him if he wanted to take in his cardboard etc and offer it to the other kids for making wheelchair ramps for their buildings – he liked that idea.  He said “yes” he wanted to do the ‘ramp thing’ more than someone building him a building.

So apparently that is exactly what he and the itinerant vision support teacher did for the assessment.  They went and offered ‘wheelchair ramping materials’ to all the other students.  Mac was assigned the role of ‘building inspector’ checking they were meeting access regulations.  I am not sure if they used any of his communication devices during this time – it would have been a good opportunity for Mac to actually be asking the questions… nothing like being ‘under the pump’ from a local government official.

From all accounts there was a wheelchair accessible cave, space station, cottage, farmhouse and skyscraper… just to name a few.

Just some more incidental learning for his classmates… can’t wait for them to be architects, builders, building inspectors, lift manufacturers and stair demolishers when they grow up.

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no limits!

This is the picture adorning the Easter gift bag Mac received from our good friends (and is now framed & hanging on the wall).

Before we arrived the kids had busied themselves creating an impressive portrait of Mac right down to some spiky hair, a rocket boosted wheelchair and a ‘vert’ ramp for carrying out some ‘gnarly tricks’

The title of the picture was “Mac the Magnificent” - how cool is that!

There are so many things to consider about ‘what’s in’ and ‘what’s not in’ the picture.

What’s in:

STYLE:
Mac has cool, coloured, and very high, hair.

SPEED:
That chair is moving fast – check out those motion lines.

SKILL:
A ‘vert’ ramp is not for the feint-hearted – I wonder, “doth high expectations maketh the man?”

SMILE:
Mac is definitely grinning in this pic – what 8yo boy wouldn’t be.

What’s not:

COTTON WOOL:
No one has thought to deny Mac the ‘dignity of risk’ – he’s not even wearing a helmet or pads ;-).

ADULT SUPPORT:
There is no sign of an ‘adult’ drawn in hovering around him.

STEREOTYPING:
Mac’s got a clear sense of style in the pic which goes some way to showing how he is perceived by others – an individual/different… sure, cool? definitely!

CLOSED THINKING:
There’s no suggestion rocket launchers shouldn’t be on wheelchairs (I wholeheartedly agree).   There is no limitation being placed on Mac.

Mac ‘the Magnificent‘… may you continue
to ‘rocket’ & roll without fear or limitation.

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eggs on legs

The Easter Hat Parade takes on a different form at our school.  For K-2 they work on your stereotypical “Easter bonnets” for the Hat Parade.   The big kids (Grades 5-6) do Egg Diorama’s called “Egg-o-ramas” (usually with a specific theme) and are, literally, something to behold.

When you are in Grades 3 & 4 you produce “Eggs on Legs”.  Generally, poster sized egg characters in many different guises that you get to carry around the parade circuit.  This year there was a huge variety including Darth ‘Vad-egg’, Spongebob Square Egg, Princess Eggs, Bunny Eggs, Dinosaurs breaking out of their Eggs,  the Jimi Hendrix “Eggs-perience”, Storm Troop-eggs, Harry Pott-eggs and so many more.

So, what to do when you’re a ‘wheelie’ who can’t carry their own ‘egg on legs’?

Isn’t it obvious…

You turn your entire wheelchair into an “Egg on Legs”!

The kids were very excited to see those legs walking on his wheels.  His classmate “J” took on the role of ‘egg pusher’ in an instant.

As I packed the eggs away in the wardrobe I thought “at least we’re done for next year ;-) “… although we may just get the kids to help us ‘tart up’ the old eggy so he at least seems ‘current’ in 2013.

And while is certainly good fun making stuff like this (and not terribly difficult) it does allow for some incidental learning for the kids.  Today they got a little insight into animation, how to ‘pimp a wheelchair’, and how to easily create funny characters with carboard, bit of timber, a glue stick, paper and thick black texta.  The whole activity gives them a great chance to explore character modifications/tweaks and start to really take in the whole idea of a ‘play on words’.  It really is a fun activity.

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Filed under Access all Areas, Inclusion... straight up!, The 'mod' squad