rampage

There was an in-class assessment task recently.  Mac & his classmates have been learning about shelters and investigating the many different shelters, buildings and constructions.   The assessment involved building a shelter during class time from materials they collected at home.  There was no limit on where or what the shelter had to be – intergalactic, subterranean, subaquatic, floating were all viable options.  I wasn’t really sure what Mac would be doing instead of building and, other than collecting scrap materials/cardboard cut offs for him, hadn’t done a lot of other preparation.

I chatted to him over breakfast about the in-class task that day.  I asked him if he wanted to take in his cardboard etc and offer it to the other kids for making wheelchair ramps for their buildings – he liked that idea.  He said “yes” he wanted to do the ‘ramp thing’ more than someone building him a building.

So apparently that is exactly what he and the itinerant vision support teacher did for the assessment.  They went and offered ‘wheelchair ramping materials’ to all the other students.  Mac was assigned the role of ‘building inspector’ checking they were meeting access regulations.  I am not sure if they used any of his communication devices during this time – it would have been a good opportunity for Mac to actually be asking the questions… nothing like being ‘under the pump’ from a local government official.

From all accounts there was a wheelchair accessible cave, space station, cottage, farmhouse and skyscraper… just to name a few.

Just some more incidental learning for his classmates… can’t wait for them to be architects, builders, building inspectors, lift manufacturers and stair demolishers when they grow up.

3 Comments

Filed under Access all Areas, Accessing the Curriculum

3 responses to “rampage

  1. Especially stairs demolishers

  2. Gina @ https://inkyed.wordpress.com

    Yes Fiona… I think there’s a whole industry just begging to take off for stair demolishing!
    Although I am confident in the future industrial designers that stair climbing mobility is not out of the question… We really just have to get away from the round wheel being the only option and consider seemingly freaky options like this military robot approach. Imagine if those components could be embedded into a powerchair so you can roll on the flat, climb up the stairs and, importantly, kick someone’s… well, you get the picture…
    http://nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com.au/2010/02/boston-dynamics-wins-32-million-darpa.html
    G

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